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For more ideas visit our 2006-2007
 class project page

...and our
  for individuals and small groups


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Poetry and Prose

Want to write some fun migration poetry or prose?  Here are some ideas to get you started.  We use them as small group brainstorming/writing activities, but they would also be great assignments for individuals.

OUR RULES

See if you can dream up some wacky rules for the monarchs, the bears, the cranes, the pilots, the weather or the people observing the migrations!

Here's an example:

 


COLORS

In this writing exercise, students associate colors with items in nature and some of their activities or functions.

The general format is as follows:

If I was  color name  I'd be an animal or object  doing a particular action.

Here's an example:

 


I AM...

It's fun to have kids write these poems, and then read them aloud and have their classmates guess the last line (i.e. what they are describing).

This is the general format:  

Descriptive word  and  descriptive word,
Descriptive word  and  descriptive word,
Descriptive word
  and  descriptive word.
Phrase describing something the animal or object does!
I am name of animal, object or force of nature...

Here's an example:

 


CHANGES...

This poem can be used to describe any sequence of steps having to do with nature, a creature's life cycle or migration.

Here's the general format:

I was a/the  first stage... and time went by.
I was a/the  second stage... and time went by.
I was a/the  third stage... and time went by.
I was a/the  final stage... and time went by.
Something the creature, object, etc. does after reaching the final stage.

Here's an example:

 


IF ONLY THEY COULD TALK...

In this poetry exercise, students are asked to think of an animal, object or force of nature they would like to learn more about.  Then, they are asked to pretend that their subject can answer questions.  Finally, they imagine that they are interviewers and formulate a series of burning  "who, why, where, when and how" questions they would like to have answered.

Here's an example:

 


...ANNNNND, ACTION!

In this poetry-writing activity, students describe the movements and sounds of an animal, object or force of nature.

The basic format is as follows.  It can be adapted to suit particular actions/sounds:

The  animal, object or force of nature  verb  location.
It   verb  location.
It   verb  location.
The  animal, object or force of nature  verb  location.
It   verb  location.
It   verb  location.
The  animal, object or force of nature  verb  location!

Here's an example:

 


THE BLUES

This can be treated as a serious piece or a tongue-in-cheek piece of poetry. Students pick an animal or migration theme and write from the point of view of the subject.

This is the basic format.  The result may be stated or implied:

When  this happens  and  this is the result,  that's the blues.
When  this happens  and  this is the result,  that's the blues.
When  this happens  and  this is the result,   that's the blues.
When  this happens  and  this is the result,   that's the blues.
When  this happens  and  this is the result,   that's the blues.

Here's an example:

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